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A theopolitical study concerning the interrelation between the Government of National Unity and religion in post-apartheid South Africa (1988-1999) with specific reference to the Dutch Reformed Church and the Anglican Church

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dc.contributor.advisor Pitchers, A.L.
dc.contributor.author Muller, Marlene
dc.date.accessioned 2010-06-07T12:58:32Z
dc.date.available 2010-06-07T12:58:32Z
dc.date.issued 2008
dc.identifier.other 316384
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10530/324
dc.description Submitted in accordance with the requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts in the Faculty of Arts in the subject ETHICS at the University of Zululand, 2008. en_US
dc.description.abstract The year 2004 marked South Africa's celebration of ten years of democracy as encapsulated by guaranteeing a better life for all. The gap between the rich and the poor as well as moral degradation challenges the euphoria of our young democracy. The South African government's commitment to non-racism, justice, democracy and non-sexism constitutes a centre of values that challenges us all to live better lives. This social-democratic society is a secular expression of a Biblical social vision. Within the juxtaposition of Theopoiitics and secularism, this research explicates the challenges of liberal and secular laws as imposed on a fervently religious country. Theopoiitics, as described as the continual interrelationship between government and church, is firmly cemented in South Africa. Nevertheless, how far would the secular, socialist-inclined government go in distancing itself from religious interference? How willing are churches to move away from a marginalised social agent to become a re-energised moral watchdog? Consequently, South Africa's transformative democracy needs to rediscover its spiritual heritage, while churches and Christianity need to invigorate Theopoiitics to participate in and guarantee the realisation of a just democratic order. This study therefore examines the level of interaction between church and state, specifically the Anglican Church and the Dutch Reformed Church. Furthermore, the degree of representation of church attendants and the electorate, as linked to transformation and their leaders in church and government respectively, are scrutinised. In conclusion, it becomes apparent that Theopoiitics will continue to play a role in the secular South Africa. Church-state relationships will be united in their shared vision of a fair, just and socio-economically viable South Africa. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.subject Church and state--South Africa en_US
dc.subject Christianity and politics--South Africa--Protestant churches en_US
dc.subject Religious right--South Africa en_US
dc.subject Anglican Church en_US
dc.subject Dutch Reformed Church en_US
dc.title A theopolitical study concerning the interrelation between the Government of National Unity and religion in post-apartheid South Africa (1988-1999) with specific reference to the Dutch Reformed Church and the Anglican Church en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


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