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The impact of the brain drain of professional nurses on nursing education and nursing practice in Kwazulu-Natal Province

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dc.contributor.advisor Kubheka, B.A.
dc.contributor.author Mkhize, Nelisiwe Virginia
dc.date.accessioned 2009-10-23T10:55:04Z
dc.date.available 2009-10-23T10:55:04Z
dc.date.issued 2006
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10530/155
dc.description Submitted in fulfilment of the requirements of the degree of D.Cur, Nursing Science Department at the University of Zululand, 2006. en_US
dc.description.abstract This study is aimed at evaluating the impact of the brain drain of professional nurses on nursing education and nursing practice. It is also aimed at identifyimg factors that contributed to the emigration of professional nurses. lastly, it is aimed at maiking recommendations on the possible solutions to the problem. The loss of professionals and other skilled people from the Southern African Development Community (SADC) region is fast assuming the dimensions of a major crisis. These countries pour vast resources into training and education of professional nurses to ensure that future skills needs are met. After this preparation, these professional nurses leave the country to work overseas. People in the United Kingdom, Canada and Middle East are the recipients of nurses, training countries are not benefiting. Emigration of these highly skilled and competent nurses to other countries seems to have a negative impact on the delivery of excellent health care services, particularly in the public sector. Emigration is embedded in the personal human right to freedom of movement and the use of an individual's knowledge and skills to improve his or her own life. Negative effects of the brain drain are further evident in the clinical areas where the learners may not get sufficient training, support and exposure due to lack of appropriate skills and expertise. In South Africa in particular, the emigration of professional nurses has increased over the past 15 years, and the international mobility of health professionals has become an important issue. Statistics show that more than 23 400 health workers from South Africa currently practice in Australia, Canada, the United States, New Zealand, United Kingdom and other countries. This figure corresponds to approximately 9,8% of all health professionals registered in South Africa, suggesting that emigration rates are significantly higher on health workers than for skilled workers in general which is 7%. According to the study done by International Labour Organization, health care professionals who left, most often, & do not return. (Nursing Update 2006: 12), en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.subject Brain Drain en_US
dc.subject Professional nurses -- KwaZulu Natal en_US
dc.title The impact of the brain drain of professional nurses on nursing education and nursing practice in Kwazulu-Natal Province en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


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